0:00 - Discusses combat

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Partial Transcript: The Chinese communists fought alongside North Korea. Hershey saw the Chinese mass on the Yellow River. The American troops and the Chinese troops suffered many losses at the Yellow River battle. The Commander of the 8th Army gave to order to evacuate North Korea. Hershey's squad was the last to leave because they had to set up the parameter to defend until the last men were aboard to leave Hungnam. They traveled to Pusan (Busan) and headed to Seoul. Seoul was devastated by the war. In April, there was a standstill, and Hershey was given an R and R. Hershey went to Tokyo, Japan. Two weeks later, the troops started to withdraw. Hershey was assigned four riflemen, and they were at a mountain to cover. On April 24, the Chinese assaulted Hershey's squad, and he gave orders for his men to withdraw. Hershey covered for his men.

Segment Synopsis:

Keywords: artillery; artillery fire; Japanese American soldiers; Nisei veterans; rifle

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3:24 - Recalls wounded; and POW

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Partial Transcript: Hershey covered for his men to go down the mountain. When Hershey's company started dropping phosphorous bombs on his location, Hershey made his way down the mountain and encountered a Chinese soldier. Hershey got wounded after killing the Chinese soldier. Later he came across barb wire while trying to attract the attention of one of his tanks that left. Hershey went 50 yards before passing out on the ground. He woke up to the sounds of troops walking nearby. Hershey was captured and brought back to an area where other men from his company were. A Squad Leader from the same machine gun section was also there wounded. They were the last to leave because they could barely move from their injuries. After the Korean War, Hershey and the Squad Leader from Boston reunited.

Segment Synopsis:

Keywords: friendship; Japanese American soldiers; marching; Nisei soldiers

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6:27 - Discusses Medal of Honor I

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Partial Transcript: Hershey did not know he was receiving the Medal of Honor until the big switch. When Hershey was released from the Prison Camp, he received the Medal of Honor for his actions on October 24 -25 from his Commanding General. Hershey said it was his duty and not the point of winning the Medal of Honor. The Medal of Honor changed many aspects of Hershey's life, and he spoke at many events. As a fellow American of Japanese ancestry, Japanese Americans are just as dedicated to the United States as any other American. Hershey felt the training and his fellow soldiers helped him, but there was a higher being that guided him through the war experience.

Segment Synopsis:

Keywords: Japanese American soldiers; Nisei soldiers; Prisoners of War

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9:50 - Discusses Medal of Honor II

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Partial Transcript: After the Korean War, Hershey learned about his men and whether they survived or not. All of his men made it to safety. However, some were wounded. A Lieutenant and Platoon Leader called Hershey and told him who recommended him for the Medal of Honor. Hershey discusses being a POW and the feeling of shock. The living conditions of a POW were rough. For over 30 days, Hershey and the other POWs were not given proper nourishment and medical attention. When they got to the POW camp, the conditions did not improve. Each man was issued a bowl and a flat spoon. Nine men were placed in a nine by nine hut for their living quarters. For work, the POWs had to walk five to six miles to cut wood.

Segment Synopsis:

Keywords: Japanese American soldiers; living conditions; Nisei soldiers; Nisei veterans; post-war; Prisoners of War

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14:10 - Recalls POW Camp

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Partial Transcript: At the POW Camp, Hershey did not get proper nourishment, medical attention, and warm clothing. Moreover, he had to walk five to six miles to cut wood. Hershey was wearing tennis shoes and rags. Hershey recalls receiving a cholera shot from a physician with a square needle. In 1952 the Peace talks started, and the names of the POWs were released. Hershey noticed the treatment was getting better with the POWS. They received uniforms, tennis shoes, rations, and athletic equipment. Rice and candy were only given on special occasions such as May Day. A daily meal in the camp consisted of one or two vegetables, millet, and pepper. Daily, they would receive a small cup of soybean milk. In addition, the ration the POW received had a little bit of sugar and tobacco. The POWs learned to put sugar in their soybean milk.

Segment Synopsis:

Keywords: Japanese American soldiers; living conditions; Nisei soldiers; Prisoners of War

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18:34 - Recalls barber

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Partial Transcript: At the POW camp, the Chinese were guarding the POWs. In the last year at the camp, Hershey volunteered to be a barber so he would not have to go on the wood detail job. One of the POWs built a barber chair out of scraps of wood. Hershey shared his experience learning how to cut hair and shave. Hershey became a professional at cutting hair, and the Company Commander came to Hershey to get his hair cut. The Chinese had a lenient policy on the POWs because they wanted to exchange the POWs for their troops who were captured by the American troops.

Segment Synopsis:

Keywords: Japanese American soldiers; Nisei soldiers; Prisoners of War

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21:16 - Discusses morale

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Partial Transcript: Hershey explains the North Koreans had a hatred for the Japanese due to the occupation. Hershey credits a North Korean lady who helped him when he wanted to give up. Hershey was starving, and she gave him a bowl of rice with peanuts. The food gave him the strength to push on. Hershey survived the 27 and a half months in the POW camp by not giving up and believing in Jesus. As one of the older POWs, Hershey encouraged the younger men to keep eating even though the food was not palatable. Hershey was not religious when his mother passed away. However, he returned to his faith and religion helped Hershey get through his war experience, POW life, and post-war.

Segment Synopsis:

Keywords: Americans of Japanese Ancestry; Issei parents; Japanese American soldiers; living conditions; Nisei soldiers; occupation; Prisoners of War

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